About

b. 1986, HK.

001_6_orig.jpg
 

CLIENTS :

Puma x Complex Magazine
Caffènation
Bang & Olufsen
Doc Martens
+ more

 

Born in 1993 in Norwich, Anmar Mirza grew up in the east of England, spending a year of his childhood living with family in Pakistan – a time which continues to inspire him to this day. During his teens Mirza experimented with multiple different creative ventures and made an impression amongst his peers for his growing talents in drawing and painting. Whilst studying graphic design at NUA, Mirza began painting murals across his hometown, tagging them with 1990. The decade between 1990 and 2000 were defining years for his family, years which the artist himself describes as having shaped everything that he does. Mirza’s family is incredibly important to him as an artist, and both influences and motivates him in all the work that he does.

With nods to Middle Eastern and Asian art forms visible in his work Mirza combines his own personal culture with an extensive knowledge of modern artistic styles. The work of artists such as Daniel Richter, M.C Escher and Eddie Martinez has been incredibly significant to Mirza and has enhanced his growth as an artist. The diverse nature of the inspiration Mirza draws upon has helped form the distinctive style that is apparent in all of his work and which has gained him a following of collectors. Mirza’s first solo show, “M’Lady”, which opened to the public in the autumn of 2015, was met with widespread praise and quickly sold out. The following year, Mirza was commissioned to create a variety of murals across Europe, including in artistic hubs such as Amsterdam and Antwerp. Both of these experiences helped Mirza refine his skills and forced him to think outside of his comfort zone. As an artist Mirza continually pushes the boundaries of traditional art in his bringing together of urban and contemporary forms. Mirza’s work is about more than just what we see; there are layers of complex storytelling in each piece, something which he also credits his mother for. For Mirza, being able to paint these stories is about getting back to a childlike sense of freedom; an escapism that viewers can also be a part of.